Last edited by Gogore
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

3 edition of Museums, archaeologists and indigenous people found in the catalog.

Museums, archaeologists and indigenous people

archaeology and the public in Nigeria

by Pamela Ifeoma Eze-Uzomaka

  • 133 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Archaeopress in Oxford .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Museums -- Public relations -- Nigeria.,
  • Archaeology -- Public relations -- Nigeria.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    StatementPamela Ifeoma Eze-Uzomaka.
    SeriesBAR international series -- 904
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsAM389.N5 E94 2000
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 210 p. :
    Number of Pages210
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22414852M
    ISBN 101841712000

    Book Description. Museums and Archaeology brings together a wide, but carefully chosen, selection of literature from around the world that connects museums and archaeology. Part of the successful Leicester Readers in Museum Studies series, it provides a combination of issue- and practice-based perspectives. As such, it is a volume not only for students and researchers from a range of.   The late 19th and early 20th centuries marked the political marginalization of many indigenous populations in the United States. Aided by reports from Native informants who agreed to serve as collectors and intermediaries about their culture, anthropologists began collecting indigenous artifacts and information about Native languages and culture.

      Brazil’s archaeologists have lined up alongside conservationists and indigenous rights campaigners to protest against government proposals that they see as a threat to pre-colonial cultural. Three chapters center on relationships between archeologists and Indigenous people, covering issues of repatriation and Indigenous rights and negotiations over archeological research. In some cases archeology is in direct disagreement with Indigenous beliefs. Indigenous people may perceive archeology as both a physical and spiritual threat.

    The dilemma for archaeology is that carting off artefacts for display in museums on the other side of the world smacks of cultural imperialism; but so does demanding that indigenous people treat. My argument is based on the premise that continuity is the key to the survival of Indigenous cultures. exponentially more difficult for museums to Indigenous people a nd archaeologists.


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Museums, archaeologists and indigenous people by Pamela Ifeoma Eze-Uzomaka Download PDF EPUB FB2

Museums, Archaeologists and Indigenous People: Archaeology and the Public in Nigeria (British Archaeological Reports British Series) [Pamela Ifeoma Eze-Uzomaka] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. In the past there has been a general lack of public involvement in the archaeology, heritage and museum management of Nigeria's by: 7.

The task force consisted of 25 Indigenous and non-Indigenous members who established 30 recommendations that now act as the ethical framework for museums and galleries working with Indigenous Peoples (TFOMFP, ).

In the s archaeologists were also pressured to address their ethical practice pertaining to First Peoples. Get this from a library.

Museums, archaeologists and indigenous people: archaeology and the public in Nigeria. [Pamela Ifeoma Eze-Uzomaka]. Indigenous archaeology is a sub-discipline of western archaeological theory that seeks to engage and empower indigenous people in the preservation of their heritage and to correct perceived inequalities in modern also attempts to incorporate non-material elements of cultures, like oral traditions, into the wider historical narrative.

The Paperback of the Museums, Archaeologists and Indigenous People: Archaeology and the Public in Nigeria by Pamela Ifeoma Eze-Uzomaka at Barnes & B&N Outlet Membership Educators Gift Cards Stores & Events Help. Analysis It’s Not Just Art That Indigenous People Are Fighting to Reclaim From Museums.

They Want Their Ancestors’ Remains Back, Too. There Author: Javier Pes. Experience the Story of Generations. The exhibit occupies 3, square feet of the museum’s main floor.

Visitors enter from the lobby through an introductory walkway where a large topographic map of Tennessee uses fiber optic lights to reveal the many excavated sites that.

indigenous people are portrayed as vanquishing cultures (Peers, Brown1). This between museums and indigenous communities, but also to the relationships that exist They are invited to excavate with archaeologists on the dig.

TheFile Size: KB. A sizable Indigenous cadre of Indigenous archaeologists has emerged since then, and many of their remarkable stories are in this book. The pathways these scholars have taken to become archaeologists are varied and fascinating, their achievements are remarkable, and their work broadens archaeology's perspectives in much needed, truly positive : George Nicholas.

Cultural Survival is concerned with the struggles of indigenous peoples. This article considers the relation between these cultures and museums, where objects are "cultural momentos," "works of primitive art," or "artifacts of ethnographic research." Other articles presented here (such as that by Tobias Schneebaum) discuss still other kinds of museums and exhibit styles.

Our Indigenous Ancestors complicates the history of the erasure of native cultures and the perceived domination of white, European heritage in Argentina through a study of anthropology museums in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Carolyne Larson demonstrates how scientists, collectors, the press, and the public engaged with Argentina’s native American artifacts and remains. Indigenous Rights and Archaeology America wanted museums. But they would be different from European ones. They would not, for instance, be stores of imperial plunder, like the British Museum or the people's perceptions of archaeologists tend to be driven by their past experiences, which have been quite unpleasant for the most part.

In File Size: KB. The Egyptian Museum of Turin in Italy specialises in Egyptian archaeology and anthropology and houses one of the largest collections of Egyptian antiquities with o artefacts. When it comes to the Indigenous remains and artifacts found in museums, private collections and government institutions across the U.S., we.

An adjunct assistant professor of anthropology of the University of Oklahoma, Joe Watkins reviewed Indians and Anthropologists: Vine Deloria, Jr., and the Critique of Anthropology () and Native Americans and Archaeologists: Stepping Stones to Common Ground () in our September/October issue.

"Few people," he says, "have discussed and defined the impact of anthropology on. ARCHAEOLOGY – Vol. II - The Role of Museums - N. Merriman ©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) Museums enable people to explore collections for inspiration, learning and enjoyment.

They are institutions that collect, safeguard and make accessible artifacts and specimens, which they hold in trust for society. Lejja is a community comprising 33 villages in Enugu State of South-Eastern is populated by the Igbo people and located about 14 Kilometers from is the location of a prehistoric archaeological site which contains iron smelting furnaces and slag dated to BC.

The village square contains over blocks of slag with an average weight of between 34 and 57 kg. Indigenous museums and cultural centres have sprung up across the developing world, and particularly in the Southwest Pacific.

This book looks to the future of museum practice through examining how these museums have evolved to incorporate the present and the future in the display of culture.

The destruction of indigenous artifacts and documents was a personal blow for the descendants of Brazil’s oldest inhabitants, who had long fought to preserve their heritage.

Under the revised Standards and Guidelines, archaeologists are expected to include indigenous participation, however, consultation with indigenous communities is only mandated for a relevant Stage 3 assessment or higher, and thus there is much space for improvement (see The Four Archaeological Stages in Ontario below).

This tradition of displaying only older generations of Indigenous art and artifacts in art museums reinforces the colonialist view that Indigenous people died out when the Europeans came.

McGlennen and her students stressed this problem in their working on the exhibition, in hopes that they could destroy this traditional view of Indigenous art.Archaeological Theory and the Politics of Cultural Heritage consensus of interpretation amongst archaeologists, the book.

people and objects helps overturn stereotypes of Indigenous people.Indigenous people and museums. Australian museums have had a leadership role in the wider recognition of the richness of Indigenous Australian culture and in addressing the history of contact between Indigenous Australians and those whose ancestral origins lay elsewhere.